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Wi-Fi: are There Any Health Risks?

Wi-Fi: are There Any Health Risks? | Eklectica.inIf it is possible for a microwave oven to interfere with Wi-Fi signals – I just read something like that on your blog – because they operate at the same frequency, is Wi-Fi then not dangerous to your health? Would having Wi-Fi in your home not be like leaving your microwave door open?

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How big is a Petabyte, Exabyte, Zettabyte, or a Yottabyte?

How big is a Petabyte, Exabyte, Zettabyte, or a Yottabyte? | Eklectica.in
This is an intuitive look at large data sizes By Julian Bunn in Globally Interconnected Object Databases.

Bytes(8 bits)

  • 0.1 bytes: A binary decision
  • 1 byte: A single character
  • 10 bytes: A single word
  • 100 bytes: A telegram OR A punched card

Kilobyte (1000 bytes)

  • 1 Kilobyte: A very short story
  • 2 Kilobytes: A Typewritten page
  • 10 Kilobytes: An encyclopaedic page OR A deck of punched cards
  • 50 Kilobytes: A compressed document image page
  • 100 Kilobytes: A low-resolution photograph
  • 200 Kilobytes: A box of punched cards
  • 500 Kilobytes: A very heavy box of punched cards

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The 20 Most Significant Inventions in the History of Food and Drink

The 20 Most Significant Inventions in the History of Food and Drink | Eklectica.in

The Royal Society, the UK’s national academy of science, has today named the fridge, pasteurised milk, and the tin can as the three most significant inventions in the history of food and drink. These relatively modern innovations outscored more ancient inventions including the fishing net, the plough, and the cork.  

The 20 Most Significant Inventions in the History of Food and Drink

Refrigeration | Pasteurisation / Sterilisation | Canning | The Oven | Irrigation Threshing Machine / Combine Harvester  | Baking  | Selective Breeding / Strains  | Grinding / Milling  | The Plough | Fermentation | The Fishing Net | Crop Rotation | The Pot | The Knife | Eating Utensils | The Cork | The Barrel | The Microwave Oven | Frying

Read on: Source: The 20 Most Significant Inventions in the History of Food and Drink – Megan Garber – The Atlantic

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Apple’s Secretive Design Process Revealed

Apple’s Secretive Design Process Revealed | Eklectica.inLike many of Apple’s inventions, the iPhone began not with a vision, but with a problem. By 2005, the iPod had eclipsed the Mac as Apple’s largest source of revenue, but the music player that rescued Apple from the brink now faced a looming threat: The cellphone. Everyone carried a phone, and if phone companies figured out a way to make playing music easy and fun, “that could render the iPod unnecessary,” Steve Jobs once warned Apple’s board, according to Walter Isaacson’s biography.

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Email Will Never Die

Email Will Never Die - The Man Who Invented It Reveals Why | Eklectica.inTexting, instant messaging, Facebook, Twitter – we have dozens of ways to pass a message from one user to the next, and yet we keep coming back to email. Why? According to the man who sent the first one, because there’s still nothing quite like it.

Possibly the most revealing statement that can be made about the power and perseverence of email is that – unlike almost everything else in the technology industry – how we use it has remained virtually unchanged for more than 40 years.

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How Two Pakistani Brothers Created the First PC Virus

How Two Pakistani Brothers Created the First PC Virus | Eklectica.inBefore vigilante hackers like Anonymous tamed the Internet, two Pakistani brothers created the first PC virus in own fight against software piracy. Their weapon: the first PC virus.
 

Twenty-five years ago, students at the University of Delaware began experiencing strange symptoms: temporary memory loss, a lethargic drive, and fits of rage. This wasn’t just any old flu—it was the world’s first personal computer virus. Known as Brain, the bug destroyed memory, slowed the hard drive, and hid a short copyright message in the boot sector, introducing the world to two soon-to-be hacker celebrities.

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